Composition in Photography

A rose is a rose is a rose, right? Well, actually no! The art of composition in photography is a very personal thing. Use your imagination along with different light sources, angles of view, size and detail to make that rose stand out. Turn it from an object to a talking point or a point of interest.
 
Perhaps one of the greatest feats you can perform as a photographer is to provoke a reaction, make people look more closely and deeply into your photos. Don't just fill your view finder, fill it intelligently.
 
Unfortunately one of the most common mistakes often made by inexperience photographers ​when 
composing a photo is to be too far away from their subject. The intended subject can actually become insignificant within the photo if this happens causing the viewer to lose interest and switch off. This is especially true if there are other distracting objects in the background.
Unfortunately one of the most common mistakes often made by inexperience photographers ​when 
composing a photo is to be too far away from their subject. The intended subject can actually become insignificant within the photo if this happens causing the viewer to lose interest and switch off. This is especially true if there are other distracting objects in the background.
glowing crystal oyste

Glowing Crystal Oyster

Get right up in close and personal with the subject and give it a good proportion of your photos canvas area with as little distractions as possible.

Composition in photography and using the "Rule of Thirds"

Traditionalists will tell you to follow the "rule of thirds" This rule says that the image should be split into nine imaginary parts by two equally spaced horizontal lines and two equally spaced vertical lines. The important compositional elements (or photo subject) should then be placed along these lines on their intersections. (the red ares of the diagram)

Rule Of Thirds

.Proponents of this technique claim that aligning a subject with these points creates more tension, energy and interest in the composition rather than simply centering the subject. For a more detailed explanation of the rule of thirds check out this link to  Wikipedia .
Remember though that composition in photography is a very personalized thing and you don't have to follow this rule, in fact many non traditional photographers choose not to. Think of your viewfinder as a canvas and decide, along with our subject, what to include, what to partially include and what to leave out entirely. Partialy included objects can create intrigue causing the viewer to wonder what is just outside the photo.
hidden boat reflections

Hidden Reflections

The theme of this photograph on the left was reflections. It is a good example of having a partially included object in the photo to create or add interest. The boat itself was to large to include fully in the photo, but by partially including it extra reflections that are not immediately obvious are added to the photo. The extra reflections of the river and trees run along the side of the boat. 

A Reflective Drink

As well as not getting close enough to your subject the opposite can also be true. A good example of this would be the photo on the right. The photo creates interest by having the dual reflections contained within the glass of water. This effectively creates a picture within a picture that encourages the viewer to look closely at the detail within the photo. However in this case less is definitely not more as the bottom of the glass is missing. Had the photo been taken from just a few inches further back the entire glass could have been included in the photograph also.
A reflectie drink

The bottom line

The bottom line then is that composition in photography is individual to the photographer taking the photo. Remember the rule of thirds if you think it does in fact add to your photo. Don't distract from your main subject by giving giving it too small a canvas area or including clutter. Try to create mood by the use of different lighting. Try to intrigue people by maybe creating a picture within a picture that has to be found. Try to create interest by rewarding the person viewing the photo more as they look more closely into it. .